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Thread: using Dartek with natural history objects?

  1. #1
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    using Dartek with natural history objects?

    Hi I was wondering if there are any concerns in using Dartek with animal specimens and textile objects. Also if there are any other suggested plastic films that are recommended for use in storing these items in a plastic sleeve.

    Thanks

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    Member JasonO's Avatar
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    I don't think there would be a problem using Dartek with those objects, though it seems rather expensive to use for only those items. Most places tend to use it sparingly and only for paintings where there is a chance the plastic will touch the paint surface, say un-framed works. Something like Tyvek would be cheaper and easier to work with.It also depends on what kind of textiles and/or animal specimens you have and what you are protecting them from, dust? Here is a nice little resource for textiles: http://www.museumtextiles.com/upload...terials.pdfYou can also ask the Listserv (http://www.paccin.org/content.php?110-ListServe), for more information.
    Quote Originally Posted by maxpethe View Post
    Hi I was wondering if there are any concerns in using Dartek with animal specimens and textile objects. Also if there are any other suggested plastic films that are recommended for use in storing these items in a plastic sleeve.Thanks

  3. #3
    PACCIN Advisory Committee Member T. Ashley McGrew's Avatar
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    I agree about Dartek. It offers the advantage of being "water clear" (of course that also means it doesn't block light if that is a concern). On the other end of the spectrum is HDPE film which is a form of polyethylene that can be effective even when when very thin (commonly .31 to .35 mil). Since is so thin and light it conforms to objects well and doesn't weigh much of anything which can be good. It is also incredibly affordable. One disadvantage is that it is so light (tissue thin) that the normally unnoticed air flow from HVAC ducts can cause move it in some cases!
    Both product though do not allow the objects to breath so in some cases you might want to avoid actually sealing them in (in cases where naturally occurring off-gassing can concentrate and effect other components). Obviously old fashioned muslin blocks light and breathes._
    T. Ashley McGrew
    PACCIN Advisory Committee member

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