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Thread: Gallery model building

  1. #1
    Member thrivers's Avatar
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    Gallery model building

    I am building a model of my museum. The museum is broken into traveling exhibit galleries and permanent collection galleries. All of the galleries are either brand new or newly remodeled, and there are not multiple floors, it is just one floor of galleries. My thoughts were to just build them all in the model in several pieces. One of my curator was suggesting not including the permanent collection galleries due their static rotation.

    My topic for discussion: Do you all feel that a model is useful enough to provide an over all feel of the museums total exhibition spaces regardless of whither or not it is the complete museum?

    Also, My plan to use a combination of 3/16" and 1/2" foamcoar. I can't make it out of anything more stable like wood, due to the fact I don't have a wood shop(for now at least). I just want to know if there are any other materials that I haven't thought of.

    Thanks
    Todd

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    Site Administrator Paul Brewin's Avatar
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    Hi Todd,

    I think models are great visualization tools, and I would think a good exercise to do and with value to curators, designers, board members, donors, etc. It's never mentioned here, but you've got me thinking that we could use a few gallery mockups here as well, so thanks! Sounds like you are thinking ahead in terms of how to build them in sections without ending up with a gigantic model that's hard to move around. In the past I've used gator foam and foam core, also 1/4" MDF and wooden dowels (for columns), although then you are into using woodworking tools to make stuff, and the model gets heavier. Balsa wood and matboard and other heavy papers are also good and very light and easy to stick together. Sintra would also be good and you can solvent weld it together. There's great architectural model building materials available (although expensive). Sticking down paper with a floor pattern printed on it (wood, stone, carpet, etc, depending on your floors) would be a nice touch. Post pictures when you get something going, and if I ever get there I'll do the same.
    Paul Brewin - PACCIN Site Administrator

  3. #3
    Member thrivers's Avatar
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    Thanks Paul.
    I didn't think about Architecture model building supplies, thats a good idea.
    Thanks for the input.

  4. #4
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    Gallery Model Building

    Todd,

    There's no such thing as a "static rotation gallery" Build the model for the entire museum. You'll be glad you did.

    Richard

  5. #5
    PACCIN Advisory Committee Member T. Ashley McGrew's Avatar
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    Amen to that Richard. Don't know how many times the boiler plate reasurance of "Don't worry we won't ever display ______ in the _______ space!" has been uttered only to be proven to be just more wishful thinking based solely - in that particular moment - on what are undoubtedly good intentions (we know where that road leads).

    In a similar vein. It should be noted that if your institution is even vaguely imaging a building expansion start in immediately developing your campaign for plywood in as many of the walls as you can pull off and as many options as possible for pulling power and data cabling!

  6. #6
    Member thrivers's Avatar
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    Thanks Richard and Ashley,
    I was just thinking along those lines...
    Also, regarding the plywood: THere is an 8' band that is 4' off the ground. we start the re-install in a month or two, and I don't feel comfortable hanging support hardware for pieces that fall below the band line that doesn't require building something that goes from the bottom of the frame to the floor. What do you think?

  7. #7
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    Todd,

    That can be a problem. Here at the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston we have come up with a way to reinforce a plaster or sheetrock wall. We use a square or rectangle of either 1/4 plywood or Luann, 4" x 4" or 4" x 6", that is screwed into the wall with 4 or more drywall screws. We then mount to hanging device to the plywood. This has worked for us for over 10 years without a single incident of an object falling because of improper hanging. This does make the objects protrude from the wall a little more than a striaght hang from the wall, but I sleep much better a night knowing that the objects are as secure as I can make them. Please feel free to call me if this isn't clear. (281) 330-7260.

    Richard

  8. #8
    Member thrivers's Avatar
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    I think I get it... In my case, the plywood would overlap onto the plywood band behind the sheetrock, creating a "bridge" so it is attached to a wood backed wall surface, then the L-bracket or security device(that is at the bottom of the frame) is screwed to the plywood "bridge".
    That is a good idea.
    Thanks

  9. #9
    Chair of Publications Chris Barber's Avatar
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    Hi Todd,
    This suggestion isn't half as fun as a physical model, but much more useful in my opinion: digital 3D modeling. Your model can be as simple or as detailed as you like, it's quick to build, and it remains maliable after you build it. You can also "install" artworks by importing images from your collection and attaching them to separate objects of appropriate dimensions, and you can crane the "camera" down into the model and look around with a more human perspective. You may have already seen this (or already use the program), but here's a short article on an application that's free to download and easy to learn. Just another option...
    Cheers,
    Chris

  10. #10
    Member thrivers's Avatar
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    Thanks Chris,
    We do currently use Sketch-up and I am trying(I stress the word trying) to teach myself Vectorworks. Thanks for the suggestion.
    Todd

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