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JasonO
04-26-2011, 10:12 AM
From the RCAAM Listserv, a recommendation for the Eltec 764 (http://www.conservationresources.com/Main/section_20/section20_17.htm):


We have the pricey but lovely Eltec 764 UV and footcandle/lux reader. With shipping, around $1,350. It was recommended to us by the Midwest Art Conservation Center, and it is utterly simple to use. We bought ours with an NEH Preservation Assistance for Smaller Institutions grant.
Karen

- We are looking to purchase some collections related material. One of the things on my list for a long time is a
- light meter that reads uv levels. Does anyone have a device they are particularly fond of? Thanks.
-
- Frank

T. Ashley McGrew
07-11-2011, 05:18 PM
Another worthy contribution from Bruce MacLeish on the RCAAM List 7/11`/2011
************************************************** **********

From:Bruce MacLeish <bruce@NEWPORTRESTORATION.ORG>

View ContactTo:RCAAM@SI-LISTSERV.SI.EDU
George, I have followed this trail, in search of reasonably-priced meters. Iím afraid the Littlemore Scientific (Elsec) models were out of my league, but I have been using a couple of meters that might be of interest to you. I am not sure where my trusty (old) visible light meter came from, but <professionalequipment.com (http://professionalequipment.com/)> carries quite an assortment, from under $100. I would probably aim for one of the Extech meters, at about $160. By the way, I can check the performance with my photographic light meter, a Gossen Luna Pro Digital and a conversion scale.

I have a separate UV meter, Mannix UV-340 (now General Tools UV513AB) which does a good job. If I had the money, I would upgrade to something a bit more elegant, but itís a big leap to the next level, which seems to be about $700. There are a number of services which still calibrate the meter I have, so I will keep using it. And you are correct, just because you donít have natural light does not mean that UV energy is not sneaking into your exhibit or storage areas somehow. If you donít have the means of checking your light, how would you be sure? You might like the variety of meters on <valuetesters.com (http://valuetesters.com/)>

Good luck with your purchases.

Bruce

A. Bruce MacLeish
Director of Collections
Newport Restoration Foundation
51 Touro Street
Newport, RI 02840

JasonO
07-12-2011, 07:40 AM
More ideas from RCAAM:

http://www.apsnyc.com/index.php?page=light-measurement

We have an Elsec for our institution and we felt it was a good investment for the long term.

http://www.sperdirect.com/cgi-bin/category.cgi?category=chartuvlight

We purchased the Elsec 764 directly from the manufacturer in the UK.

http://www.elsec.com/acatalog/764.html

Given the exchange rate, we were able to save a considerable amount of money, and shipping charges were very reasonable.

chilijohn
07-13-2011, 01:12 PM
Another worthy contribution from Bruce MacLeish on the RCAAM List 7/11`/2011
************************************************** **********

From:Bruce MacLeish <bruce@NEWPORTRESTORATION.ORG>

View ContactTo:RCAAM@SI-LISTSERV.SI.EDU
George, I have followed this trail, in search of reasonably-priced meters. Iím afraid the Littlemore Scientific (Elsec) models were out of my league, but I have been using a couple of meters that might be of interest to you. I am not sure where my trusty (old) visible light meter came from, but <professionalequipment.com (http://professionalequipment.com/)> carries quite an assortment, from under $100. I would probably aim for one of the Extech meters, at about $160. By the way, I can check the performance with my photographic light meter, a Gossen Luna Pro Digital and a conversion scale.

I have a separate UV meter, Mannix UV-340 (now General Tools UV513AB) which does a good job. If I had the money, I would upgrade to something a bit more elegant, but itís a big leap to the next level, which seems to be about $700. There are a number of services which still calibrate the meter I have, so I will keep using it. And you are correct, just because you donít have natural light does not mean that UV energy is not sneaking into your exhibit or storage areas somehow. If you donít have the means of checking your light, how would you be sure? You might like the variety of meters on <valuetesters.com (http://valuetesters.com/)>

Good luck with your purchases.

Bruce

A. Bruce MacLeish
Director of Collections
Newport Restoration Foundation
51 Touro Street
Newport, RI 02840



After doing much on-line reseach on this, I found that the more expesive meters are no more accurate than the less expensive models.

John Dreckmann
Lighting Preparator
Milwaukee Art Museum

chilijohn
07-13-2011, 01:13 PM
After doing much on-line reseach on this, I found that the more expensive meters are no more accurate than the less expensive models.

John Dreckmann
Lighting Preparator
Milwaukee Art Museum

JasonO
12-27-2011, 12:13 PM
This light meter was just recommended on RCAAM. It doesn't have UV, but looks like it is pretty easy to use for measuring basic light levels.

(http://www.sekonic.com/Products/i-346/Overview.aspx)

Jason

JasonO
04-19-2012, 06:40 AM
Here is a new recommendation from the PACCIN Listserv (posted with permission).

The question was "Today I'm looking for recommendations for a digital light meter that can do readings in lux and foot candles. My photography background has me leaning towards a Sekonic but I wonder if there is another museum/gallery favorite out there."

Here is Scott's answer:

Whatever you get, make sure it’s an illuminance meter (not just a light meter that may read in f-stops rather than Lux or foot-candles). I am not familiar with the Sekonic illuminance meters, they are relatively inexpensive -- it would be great if they are reliable. Here is what I know:

The Elsec meter is probably the most expensive (and best) illuminance meter for museum applications. It’s my favorite best because it has options (at additional cost) to add UV, IR, Temp and Humidity measurements.

http://www.elsec.com/acatalog/EMon.html

I typically use meters by Cooke (Cal light 400-f) for illuminance readings on museum objects. I like the Cooke meter because it can switch from Footcandles to Lux, it automatically shuts off, it’s half the price of the Elsec, and it’s instant on (it doesn’t require recalibration with a lens cap). Minolta also makes fantastic meters , but I think they only measures in either footcandles or Lux.

http://www.cookecorp.com/industrial-products/light-measuring-systems/cal-light-400f/

Lastly, I’ve purchased an inexpensive meter from Extech. That meter regularly fell apart (required re-soldering of connections) and after 5 years the electronics gave out. Whatever meter you purchase make sure that a NIST certificate is available. I have no idea if it’s worth the price to actually purchase the certificate, but not offering the option of a certificate is deal breaker for me.

Scott


Scott Rosenfeld, LC, IESNA
Smithsonian American Art Museum